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Hyperinsulinemia: Best management practice

Catherine Anne Price Crofts , Caryn Zinn, Mark C Wheldon, Grant M Schofield

Catherine Anne Price Crofts
Auckland University of Technology (AUT). Email: ccrofts@aut.ac.nz

Caryn Zinn
Human Potential Centre, Auckland University of Technology (AUT), PO Box 92006, Auckland 1142,

Mark C Wheldon
Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Auckland University of Technology (AUT), PO Box 92006, Auckland 1142,

Grant M Schofield
Human Potential Centre, Auckland University of Technology (AUT), PO Box 92006, Auckland 1142
Online First: January 15, 2016 | Cite this Article
Crofts, C., Zinn, C., Wheldon, M., Schofield, G. 2016. Hyperinsulinemia: Best management practice. Diabesity 2(1): 1-11. DOI:10.15562/diabesity.2016.21


Chronic hyperinsulinemia associated with insulin resistance is directly and indirectly associated with many metabolic disorders that contribute to significant morbidity and mortality. Because hyperinsulinemia is not widely recognised as an independent health risk, there are few studies that assess management strategies. Medication management may not address the multiple issues associated with hyperinsulinemia. Lifestyle management includes physical activity, especially high intensity interval training, and dietary management. Reducing carbohydrate quantity and increasing nutrient density are discussed with carbohydrate-restricted and Mediterranean diets conferring additional benefits to a low-fat diet. Physical activity and dietary management provide the foundation for hyperinsulinemia management and may work synergistically. Of these principles, a combination of resistance and high intensity interval training, and carbohydrate restriction provide the two most effective frontline management strategies for managing hyperinsulinemia.
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